best practices for pouring wine

Pouring Wine At The Table: 8 Etiquette Rules

who this class is for

Restaurant guests, waiters and restaurant staff

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About this micro-class

Pouring wine is an art that complements the overall dining experience. With practice and attention to detail, you will master this elegant ritual, leaving a lasting impression on your guests.

Etiquette Rules for Pouring Wine

1. Pouring the First Taste

After opening the bottle and presenting the cork, pour the first taste.

Pour a small amount into the host’s glass. This allows them to assess the wine’s condition and confirm their satisfaction.

The host is usually the guest who ordered the wine. If you are unsure about who should taste the wine, politely ask “who is going to taste the wine?”

Hold the bottle at the base, with the label visible, and pour slowly and steadily.

2. Waiting for Approval

Wait for the host’s approval of the wine. Then, fill the host’s glass before pouring wine for the other guests.

3. Pouring for the Guests

Pour for the ladies first, then the gentlemen, proceeding clockwise around the table.

Pour wine into the center of the glass, avoiding spillage.

Aim for approximately one-third full to allow for proper aeration. Don’t overfill the glasses.

4. Wiping the Bottle

After pouring, wipe the neck of the bottle with a clean cloth to remove any potential drips. This ensures a pristine presentation.

5. Pouring from the Right Side

The wine glasses must be placed to the right of the water glass, on the right side of each place setting.

Pour the wine from each guest’s right side to avoid crossing the guests and minimize the risk of spills.

6. Silent Service

While pouring, be attentive to the guest’s needs but avoid unnecessary conversation during this delicate moment.

7. Refilling Glasses

Be mindful of guests with empty glasses, and offer refills discreetly.

Remember, it’s preferable to slightly under-pour than over-pour. Guests can always request more.

8. Closing the Ritual

Once everyone’s glass is filled, step back with a nod and a discreet smile, ensuring you haven’t interrupted the conversation.

Test your knowledge with a quick test and earn a free micro-certificate

Shop for etiquette, behavioral, and contextual signs

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